Tag: National Endowment for Democracy’s] Journal of Democracy

Democracy is ‘not immune’ to coronavirus

     

The requirements of social distancing are making every facet of life more difficult to maintain — including democracy, a fragile system of governance not immune to being ravaged by COVID-19. Perhaps… Read more »

Memory laws – ‘a litmus test for new democracies’

     

In his 2019 book, “After the Fall: Crisis, Recovery and the Making of a New Spain,” Tobias Buck of the Financial Times reports that in 2018 there were 1,143 Spanish streets named for Franco… Read more »

Back to the future: Another populist, volatile ‘roaring twenties’?

     

The populist test to liberal democracy will remain robust throughout the 2020s,  argues Yasmeen Serhan, a London-based staff writer at The Atlantic: Across Europe, populist leaders have displayed their willingness to… Read more »

A case for liberal democratic nationalism?

     

Viewed from today’s perspective, it seems clear that liberalism and nationalism are enemies. But that was not always the case. As recently as 1989, liberalism and nationalism were allies in… Read more »

How populism went mainstream

     

There is a specter haunting not just Europe, but the whole globe, quaking the boots of established political parties, legacy media outlets, and transnational institutions of government and civil society…. Read more »

How to reverse global drift toward authoritarianism

     

Autocrats and populists are on the march around the world, including in European countries that were seen until recently as firmly in the democratic camp. The phenomenon, coupled with the… Read more »

Pervasive protests affirm civic activism, but carry serious risks

     

People all over the world are resorting to mass demonstrations to express grievances and press unmet demands, notes Aryeh Neier, President Emeritus of the Open Society Foundations and a founder… Read more »

How authoritarian populist Morales ‘went too far’ for Bolivia

     

Bolivia’s political crisis deepened Sunday as President Evo Morales resigned amid allegations of “serious irregularities” during last month’s election and pressure from the country’s armed forces. Morales faced mounting protests in the… Read more »

Latin America risks becoming ‘land of militarized democracies’

     

Latin America used to be known as the land of the military junta. It is now at risk of becoming the land of militarized democracies, according to Javier Corrales, a… Read more »

Do Southeast Asia elections signal a consolidation of illiberal rule?

     

  Since the fall of the Indonesian dictator Suharto in 1998, civil society has flourished under the country’s burgeoning democracy. Observers even began calling Indonesia the most democratic nation in… Read more »