Tag: Journal of Democracy

From cover-up to global donor: China’s Covid-19 sharp power play

     

China is sending doctors and medical supplies to Italy and other countries that have been hit hard by the coronavirus. WSJ’s Eric Sylvers in Milan explains how China is using… Read more »

How authoritarians subvert constitutional constraints

     

Today’s authoritarians use legal measures to subvert constitutional constraints on their power, note analysts Tim Horley, Anne Meng and Mila Versteeg. Our original study documents all term-limit-evasion strategies worldwide since the year… Read more »

Autocratization poses challenge for democracy assistance strategies

     

Illiberals are neither fully committed to civil liberties – such as freedom of expression, assembly and association – and the rule of law, nor totally devoted to the institutions that… Read more »

What factors foster – and obstruct – democracy’s development & consolidation?

     

Conditions of Democracy is the first course from Stanford”s Larry Diamond, co-editor of the NED’s Journal of Democracy, in a two-part series intended as a broad survey of the political,… Read more »

Sudan’s transition ‘a once in a lifetime opportunity’

     

The international community must immediately boost its support to Sudan to accelerate its democratic transition, allowing it to sustain peace and accelerate much-need development, said the Head of the United… Read more »

Democracy embattled: How to make renewal happen?

     

A growing number of think tanks uses the World Economic Forum’s conference in Davos as an opportunity to release headline grabbing studies, analyst Mike O’Sullivan writes for Forbes. Of the… Read more »

Why liberal democracy is on the defensive

     

To understand why liberal democracy is on the defensive, there is no better place to start than the 30th-anniversary edition of the Journal of Democracy, the  flagship publication of the… Read more »

The return of ideology? Western societies’ resilience ‘not a given’

     

America must grapple with the reality that the unipolar moment is ending, the Texas National Security Review suggests.  A new bipolarity is fast emerging from the political wreckage of the… Read more »

Memory laws – ‘a litmus test for new democracies’

     

In his 2019 book, “After the Fall: Crisis, Recovery and the Making of a New Spain,” Tobias Buck of the Financial Times reports that in 2018 there were 1,143 Spanish streets named for Franco… Read more »

Political competition between governance systems is ‘nothing new’

     

Russia’s Vladimir Putin and China’s Xi Jinping have established themselves as the world’s most powerful authoritarian leaders in decades. Now it looks like they want to hang on to those… Read more »